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Gil Scott-Heron – Home Is Where The Hatred Is

Something very powerful dawned on me yesterday and it’s the fact that we’ve been taught to be afraid of our imagination. For example, if someone came into the spotlight and said ‘the world is nothing but a projection, nothing you see is actually here, it’s just a collective visualization,’ most people would say that person is crazy.  Now do we really think he or she is crazy or are we just afraid of the fact that something like that could be possible? There was a time when it was a ‘fact’ that the world was flat. Picture humans in the year 2514, what ‘fact’ or ‘truth’ that we believe now will be totally inaccurate. Now picture humans 1000 years from that point, what will be turned upside down then? What if we as a collective tried to look at things like that? Would we make incremental leaps in our awareness and emotional capacity or would we make quantum leaps and be somewhere in the cosmos by now?

It should come at no surprise to no one that the world is in the midst of a massive paradigm shift. With technology as the driving force people are challenging age-old institutions like never before. Whenever you hear a politician say something “threatens our values” or is going to ‘destroy our institutions’ you can assure you’re self that they’re about upholding the consensus trance. Old power hides behind ideals and institution in order to maintain order, anything that will make people look at things in a new way, outside of these ‘noble’ ideals is immediately detrimental. Will technology outpace old power and permanently change things for the better? I think that’s up to us.

Old power is held like a currency, new power works like a current.
Old power is held by a few, new power is made by many.
Old power is all about download, new power is about uploads.
Old power commands, new power shares.
Old power is leader-driven, new power is peer-driven.
Old power is closed, new power is open.”

Times are definitely changing but old power still rules and has an iron grip on our minds.  So here we are in this collective trance made up of our culture, rules, status quo’s and ‘reality.’ Instead spending our time diving deep into the power of our imagination, we spend it working hard to buy things. Grinding, hustling, getting it! Our natural state, our mental homes, are housing projects created by a system. We go home to each other with the same limited frames of mind, we argue about love from the confines of this limited perspective, we feel inadequate because we don’t have this or that. Our most vulnerable state is in the comfort of our homes, the place where one lives permanently. But what if this home isn’t allowing us to dream or flourish to our full potential. If our mental homes are the products of old power thinking and control…

It might not be such a bad idea if I never went again…”

Home Is Where the Hatred Is by Gil Scott-Heron on Grooveshark

Categories
Music

Gil Scott Heron – Home Is Where The Hatred Is

What is it about funk music that gets me going? Is it the mixture of soul and R&B? Smooth vocals? Or could it possibly be the long train runnin’ kind of musical beat? I’ve always associated the sounds of funk with the movement of trains; the sounds keep chugging along down the track. They don’t glide, but the way is smooth and the destination is unknown; either way, though, the trip is always feel good. I’m taking the train home today for the first time since March. 8 hours of sitting on an Amtrak train making its way north-west. I’m going home to a house my family moved to after I graduated high school. It’s not my home home, but it’s my family and therefore it’s home.

I woke up this morning, looked at my packed weekender bag and carry-on, and suddenly felt the need to turn this track on. There’s something in Heron’s voice that reminds me of the town I grew up in. Hindsight has taught me that the central New York college town is actually one of the best places to grow up in. I remember, however, itching to get out of there as soon as I could. On Friday nights I’d occasionally make it down to the university campus and see some shows at this underground cafe/art space called Funk n’ Waffles. The space was filled with new art, muted earthy wall colors with pops of orange, and a nice DIY stage covered in blankets and tapestries. They made a mean latte, served delicious waffles and carried one of my favorite teas called Purple Haze (a lavender tea y’all should try). Friday nights, the owner would bring in relatively unknown acts that ended up being incredible artists. A lot of my music pallet was formed here. When there wasn’t a show going on, funk music would be playing and the youth would hang out. Heron was a constant on their sound system and hearing him this morning has brought me back to a place I now consider my home.

Gil Scott Heron – Home Is Where The Hatred Is