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Kevin Casey’s Sample Saturday – Jack Mayborn et Prodigy

Oh yall niggas killas now, oh word?  Catch you coming out your fuckin’ crib!”

Mobb Deep are undoubtedly one of the hardest duo’s to ever threaten your life on a record, and be assured that when P runs as a solo artist, the pressure don’t let up.  Prodigy fully embodies that tough edge that defined New York hard core rappers in the 90’s.  When real life adversity catches up to us, and it becomes easier to not fight back, I think we all could use a lil’ 90’s NY rapper in our attitude and outlook.  No scared competitors are going to win in New York, and no bitch made tendencies will be tolerated, so toughen up!  Prodigy faced real problems with the law, rap kingpins, and his health, and still put out an album entitled H(ead).N(igga).I(n).C(harge), which included “Keep It Thoro”, one of the hardest records with one of the hardest lines…

I break bread, ribs, hundred dolla bills…”

One definite asset in Prodigy’s success was the unwavering loyalty from producer, Alchemist.  ALC has always had some of the hardest beats in the game, and he seemingly never held back any heat from Mobb Deep.  “Keep It Thoro” and it’s Jack Mayborn sample is a perfect example of hard-digging paying off.  Definitely one of the digs that, as a producer, you would have done anything to get to to it first.  I mean, listen to that thing.  Well, if it wasn’t me, I’m glad it was ALC who did find it, because I’m not sure who else could/would have matched it with such a perfect snare, and perfect swing.  Put this on repeat for a while, and Keep It Thoro.

Jack Mayborn – Music People

Prodigy – Keep It Thoro

 

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Music

EMPT & BROBIBLE.com Present: Gold For Breakfast Vol. 1 by Casey Mendoza


I hope ya’ll are in a party mood because today EMPT & BroBible.com announce the first mixtape from new DJ/production group Casey Mendoza, aka myself and Kevin Casey. If you’ve been to one of our Noctambule parties the energy in this tape will bring you back to the debauchery and possibly make you start jumping so be ready to move when you’re listening. Ideal playing time for this tape is no earlier than 11:20 PM or in the gym. If that Rex Ryan / Justice intro doesn’t get you going then you must be a Patriots fan but it’s ok Tom Brady lovers can enjoy the gold too…

Last year, hey we we’re under the radar that’s a good place to be F&^K THAT! The best place to be is when expectations are high, get use to it, it’s always gonna be that way…
 
We don’t give a shit if you give us your best game, we’re gonna give you our best game and we’re gonna beat the f*#k out of you. How’s that? Lets go get it!

If you’ve been here before you know how serious I take entertainment and that intro is exactly how I feel about what Casey Mendoza represents – showtime. We’re here to put on a show no one has seen before, we don’t care if other DJ’s are selling you short cause we’re coming strong. There’s all sorts of blends, mash-ups, mixes happening here with 3 or 4 songs playing simultaneously at times! It’s hard to tell where a song starts and another begins but here’s the tracklist for the curious ones…

Et Musique Pour Tous & BROBIBLE Present: Gold For Breakfast Vol. 1 by caseymendoza

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Tracklisting:

1. Intro:
Rex Ryan – Hard Knocks Speech / Justice – Genesis / Bill Conti – Going The Distance vs. Mobb Deep – Shook Ones (Casey Mendoza Blend)
2. Fedde Le Grand – Back & Forth (Feat Mr. V) / Steve Aoki – I’m In The House (Feat. Zuper Blahq)
3. Bombs Away – Big Booty Bitches / Kid Cudi – Embrace The Martian (Round Table Knights Remix) / Pursuit of Happiness (Them Jeans Remix)
4. Tiga – Beep Beep Beep (Crookers Remix) / Richard Vission & Static Revenger starring Luciana – I Like That (Original Mix)
5. Llyod Banks – Beamer, Benz, or Bentley (Scene Uptempo Remix) / Snoop Dogg – I Wanna Rock B-More Version)
6. Snoop Dogg – I Wanna Rock (Original) / Fat Joe – Slow Down (Ha Ha) / Snoop Dogg – Drop It Like It’s Hot
7. Slick Rick – La Di Da Di / Red Cafe – Hottest In The Hood
8. Jay-Z – 99 Problems / Red Hot Chilli Peppers – Can’t Hot
9. Kanye West – Christian Dior Denim Flow
10. Estelle – I Can Be A Freak / Chemical Brothers – Do It Again / Hyper Crush – Ayo ( Prod. By Diplo ) / Katie Perry – California Gurls [Inner Party System Remix Edit]
11. Stromae – Alors On Danse (Kanye West Remix) / Boys Noize – Oh! (A-Trak Remix) / Drake – Over
12. Drake – Forever / Tweet – Oops (Oh My) (feat. Milly Elliot) / Kanye West – Power
13. Outro:
Notorious B.I.G. – Juicy vs. DJ Quicksilva (Casey Mendoza Blend) / Vato – Speaking In Tounges / Red Cafe – I’m Ill / J.R. Writer – Go Cinderella / 9 (Elijah Wood) – “What Happens Next?”


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Music

Kevin Casey’s Sample Saturday – Barclay James Harvest et Mobb Deep

Sometimes I feel I gotta… Better Way?… (I’ll get to that later).  Mobb Deep’s fifth album Infamy came onto the scene with the street single “Burn”, a record that still in the right New York venue will get things pretty hype.  At the time of Infamy’s release, M-O-B-B was coming off a very publicized diss from Jay-Z, and a few off the records including “Burn” were perceived as responses to Hov.  The album gave the fans the street shhh they expected, but also widened the group’s sound with track’s like “Hey Luv”, which sonically was unlike anything we had ever heard from the duo.  Whether the risk of “Hey Luv” helped or hurt the group, its hard to say, but one thing that is clear is that they gave us a true Mobb Deep classic with “Get Away”.  On a few occasions, when asking people their favorite track on Live From New York… the response was “Get Away”.  There is something uniquely cinematic about the record that made it a standout, even amongst some of the best tracks in it’s era.

Although for years I thought it was Alchemist, it was actually producer EZ Elpee that dug out the crack loop off of Barclay James Harvest’s 1977 album Gone To Earth. The four bars starting at 0:16 in “Taking Me Higher” needed to only be sped up slightly to give Elpee the foundation for a spooky beat. Taking it back to the first sentence of the post, the lyrics of the sample actually say “a BETTER WAY”, but even when listening closely to the track, there is little to no audible difference between the two phrases. Bottom line is… it works.  The hi hats are very dominant in the mix, and were sequenced in the beginning of the record to give “Get Away” it’s signature intro. Their heart is the hood.

Barclay James Harvest – Taking Me Higher

Mobb Deep – Get Away

via KevinCaseyMusic

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Music

Kevin Casey’s Sample Saturday – The Whispers et Mobb Deep

For all those sample heads that read these posts check out this Complex Magazine’s writeup; “The 50 Greatest Samples of all Time.” Mobb Deep’s involvement in the East/West feud of the mid-nineties is no secret.  In an alleged, but pretty clear response to 2Pac, the group decided to “Drop A Gem On ‘Em” for the promo single off of their soon to drop album Hell On Earth.  It was recorded and given initial airplay while Pac was still alive, but when the album officially released he had already passed.  As you would expect, the threatening and cryptic lyrics caused controversy after 2Pac’s death.

I had the whole New York State aiming at your face…:

Not many producers are as on point as Havoc when it comes to turning a straight loop into a classic record.  He lifted the intro piano off a dirty vinyl of  “Can’t Help But Love You” by The Whispers, and that was that.  To me, the snare makes the record unique.  Their early stuff is just so tough…it’s the Infamous Mobb.

The Whispers – Can’t Help But Love You

Mobb Deep – Drop A Gem On ‘Em

via Kevin Casey Music

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Music

Sigur Ros vs. Mobb Deep – Shook (Emancipator Mash Up)

Back in the day, New York City 1995…”

One of my favorite golden era hip hop albums is Mobb Deeps The Infamous. This classic album portrays the struggles and harsh realities of ghetto life to perfection. We did a piece back in ’09 announcing Kevin Casey’s Live From New York, I wanted to repost it because it represents what the verse in this amazing mash-up means to me, enjoy.

Man look at these suckers. I ain’t no rapper, I’m a hustler. It just so happens I know how to rap.”

In the beginning Hip Hop was about b-boying, djing, graffiti and emceeing. The drug game of the late 1980’s changed the ghetto so it was only natural that it would change the music as well. Additionally, Hip Hop itself became quite profitable and in turn created an opportunity for a lot of trapped young artists to leave a life of crime, danger and limits. I’ve come to realize that people perform at the highest level when their backs are against the wall. The extreme conditions and adversity that came from living in the hood was transferred into a musical energy and realness that was able to touch and reach an entire world. It was survival of the fittest and to be an emcee in the 90s you had to hold your own, no exceptions.

You see me all my life I had to sell drugs, while you grew up with straight nerds, I grew up with thugs.”

Why the brief history? Well, if you want to appreciate New York City’s mid to late 90s Hip Hop you’ll have to realize that these guys aren’t just talking loud and being aggressive for no reason, they’re representing an attitude one needed to have in order to survive and stay sane in the concrete jungle that was NYC in the 90s. Look at it this way, you don’t go into a battlefield to put your gun down, read a book, have some tea and talk about where you want to be next summer. You’re going to be screaming and hollering, cold, alert and focused at all costs; you’re going to be aggressive and you’re going to be challenging that next man if he’s trying to take you out. Like I said, it was a concrete jungle and survival of the fittest was the type of mentality that applied, “only the strong survive.

That was the mindset in NYC because prior, and even during Giuliani, that was the reality. I’m not praising it or saying it was correct but if you want to appreciate the music for what it is without having actually experienced that lifestyle, then you have to listen with some perspective. So when you hear lyrics that sound somewhat extreme, violent, and brutal, understand that it is just the top layer and the language only serves to represent issues that went much deeper than the words being used to represent them. Lastly, the only way to escape an extreme circumstance sometimes is to develop an extreme type of mentality…

Sigur Ros vs. Mobb Deep – Shook (Emancipator Mash Up)

Categories
Music

Kevin Casey Music Presents Live From New York (1994-2001)

Man look at these suckers. I ain’t no rapper, I’m a hustler. It just so happens I know how to rap.”

In the beginning Hip Hop was about b-boying, djing, graffiti and emceeing. The drug game of the late 1980’s changed the ghetto so, it was only natural that it would change the music as well. Additionally, Hip Hop itself became quite profitable and in turn created an opportunity for a lot of trapped young artists to leave a life of crime, danger and limits. I’ve come to realize that people perform at the highest level when their backs are against the wall. The extreme conditions and adversity that came from living in the hood was transferred into a musical energy and ‘realness’ that was able to touch and reach an entire world. It was survival of the fittest and to be an emcee in the 90’s you had to hold your own, no exceptions.

You see me all my life I had to sell drugs, while you grew up with straight nerds, I grew up with thugs.”

Why the brief history? Well, if you want to appreciate New York City’s mid to late 90’s Hip Hop you’ll have to realize that these guys aren’t just talking loud and being aggressive for no reason, they’re representing an attitude one needed to have in order to survive and stay sane in the concrete jungle that was NYC in the 90’s. Look at it this way, you don’t go into a battlefield to put your gun down, read a book, have some tea and talk about where you want to summer next year. You’re going to be screaming and hollering, cold, alert and focused at all costs; you’re going to be aggressive and you’re going to be challenging that next man if he’s trying to take you out. Like I said, it was a concrete jungle and survival of the fittest was the type of mentality that applied, “only the strong survive”

That was the mindset in NYC because prior and even during Guiliani that was the reality. I’m not praising it or saying it was correct but if you want to appreciate the music for what it is without having actually experienced that lifestyle, then you have to listen with some perspective. So when you hear lyrics that sound somewhat extreme, violent, and brutal, understand that that is just the top layer and the language only serves to represent issues that went much deeper than the words being used to represent them. Lastly, the only way to escape an extreme circumstance sometimes is to develop an extreme type of mentality. Most people don’t have to deal with such challenges in life so it may be hard to relate. For the sake of this mixtape I suggest you try, it will be worth it.

With that said, we exclusively present a mixtape that captures that time in New York City better then anything I’ve yet to hear – Kevin Casey Music Presents: Live From New York. Officially this is a mixtape but the editing and thought process displayed on this tape will make you think you are listening to an extremely well produced album. The transitions and details from song to song are flawless and carefully crafted. It’s not often a mixtape displays this level of depth with no compromise of quality. Kevin Casey has done his research to provide listeners with an expansive yet refined taste for the best NYC had to offer. Pretty much all classic mainstream and underground NYC hits are represented. However, only the best verses from the wide spectrum made the cut, making the listening experience easy and extremely entertaining. Having grown up listening to this music, I can tell you this was no easy task. Rappers were hungry back in the day and there were a lot of good verses but Casey did in fact manage to narrow it down to the best. All the rappers you hear on this tape are at their absolute prime and deliver their lyrics with the energy and hostility of the street. Like the time it represents, this tape is hardcore, gritty, challenging and extremely entertaining. This mixtape is available as a free download at KevinCaseyMusic.com and was made for the sole purpose of spreading good music. It’s been a while since New York City’s golden era was revisited with such thoughtfulness and sincerity; this is truly worth the listen. All that said, let me end this post like the tape begins:

New York will… not… lose… ever!

Live From New York (Intro)

Live From New York (Intro)

MP3

Mixtape